Telling The Story Of Water One Photo At A Time

Water Reporter app empowers people to document conditions by phone It seems that since the dawn of the age of mobile phones, middle-aged people have been telling younger folks to leave the phone at home when getting out into nature. Something about the urge to post and share pretty pictures from mountaintops and waterfalls just […]

A leaking ark: Reports reveal pollution problems and species loss

Two reports released this week reveal dangerous holes in our haphazard collection of environmental safeguards. The first, an investigation by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Inspector General (IG), found that sewage treatment plants in America fail to address hundreds of hazardous chemicals routinely released by industry. The second, by the international conservation group World Wildlife […]

Shenandoah’s snot-grass isn’t child’s play

It sounds like something kids would say to gross each other out: snot-grass. But to Shenandoah Riverkeeper Jeff Kelble and others who use the river, it’s serious business. For the past 10 years, according to Kelble’s group, long strips of slimy green algae (reminiscent of certain substances known to emanate from human nostrils) have formed […]

A High Water Test for C Spout Run

C Spout Run’s streambank restoration project was only days old when it got tested by the heavy rainfall in the Mid-Atlantic a few weeks ago. Spout Run, a tributary of the Shenandoah River, swelled from its typical flow rate of about 22 cubic feet per second (cfs) to 800 cfs; a 36-fold increase in volume. […]

2014: The Year of Living Dangerously

Winter brought us the MCHM spill in the Elk River near Charleston, West Virginia and the coal ash release into North Carolina’s Dan River.  Suddenly, spring seems just as frightening. Last week, a CSX train carrying crude oil derailed in Lynchburg, Virginia, shooting flames into the air and releasing an estimated 30,000 gallons of crude […]

From Binocs to Binary: Citizen Science in the Digital Age

You could say it all started with the Christmas Bird Count back in 1900. According to the Audubon Society, that’s the year ornithologist Frank Chapman proposed a new holiday tradition. Instead of shooting as many birds as possible (at the time, a treasured part of the holiday for many), why not count as many as […]

EPA Agrees: We All Live Downstream

In a draft scientific report the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has confirmed what many of us already know:  That small streams – and many wetlands — substantially affect the physical, chemical and biological makeup of rivers downstream. This seemingly simple concept has big implications.  For years, environmentalists, trade associations, citizens and government agencies have […]

Summer’s End

  Garden fresh tomatoes and crisp cucumbers. A cool swimming hole and a paddle down the river. A quiet evening fishing and a campsite by the creek. What did you enjoy this summer? Whatever it was, chances are it depended on clean water. We often take clean water for granted these days, but not so […]

Lasers shed light on the Shenandoah’s TMDL

[ylwm_vimeo height=”366″ width=”550″]72688308[/ylwm_vimeo]     Article by Ronda Nickey Lehman, President Blue Ridge Watershed Coalition Since the signing of the Chesapeake Bay Executive Order by President Obama, the calculation of “TMDL,” or “total maximum daily load” for the Bay’s tributaries has been a point of controversy for many people living in the Bay watersheds. Their concerns […]

Rain Rain Go Away? Not with Green Infrastructure.

Perhaps you welcomed last week’s daily rainfall in the Mid-Atlantic as a cool respite from August heat. Or maybe you resented it for disrupting your vacation. Your flowers probably loved the regular watering, even if your tomatoes craved more sunlight. Beach days notwithstanding, most of us consider summer rain to be a good thing. But […]